The 3 Steps of Distilling Alcohol


| 11/5/2020 4:29:00 PM


A commercial still from BJ Hookers in Houston TX

Many people mistake the distilling process as the “alcohol creation” process. Rather, it is the process in which a chemical, in this case ethanol alcohol, is removed from another chemical. The process is centuries old, and is used in a myriad of applications from alcohol distillation to essential oil extraction.

Luckily, this post is primarily focused on alcohol distillation. Why luckily? Because who doesn’t like a stiff drink every now and again?

The overall process of alcohol distillation can be summed up into 3 parts: Fermentation, Distillation, and Finishing.

Fermentation

Any of you who have ever made beer or wine will see this process as old hat, but in the effort for maximum clarity, we will cover it for everyone. The basics of the fermentation process are thus:



  1.        Introduce sugar to liquid and yeast
  2.        Over time the yeast process the sugar into alcohol
  3.        After a certain time the yeast stop producing alcohol as the sugar has been fully consumed.

What most people don’t understand is, alcohol is really just the excrement of yeast. Yes, alcohol is yeast pee. (Makes you look at your gin and tonic a bit differently, doesn’t it?)



Become a Fermentation Member Today!

Fermentation

Discover how EASY and HEALTHY crafting your own money-saving fermented masterpieces can be. 

Transform mealtimes like never before and stay healthy at the same time with a one-year membership to Fermentation for only $29.95. Learn to regularly include fermented food and drinks in your diet naturally, combat bad bacteria and strengthen your immune system.

Fermentation will open up your world to the foods you can eat to improve your health. You'll learn how to make them, how they originated and what tools and ingredients you'll need to create your own delicious fermented foods and drinks. Become a member today and save as much as 25% off the newsstand price!




Facebook Pinterest Instagram YouTube Twitter

fermentation