Ye'tef Injera Recipe

Learn how to make these tangy teff sourdough crepes known as “ye’tef injera”. Both tasty and healthy, these little guys are a perfect side-dish.

| May 2019

ye'tef-Injera 

This recipe is for folks like me who don’t own a mitad (a traditional injera griddle), as it produces injera that are smaller than those found in restaurants, making them more manageable to cook. If you’ve already made Ersho, homemade injera will take an additional thirty-six hours to ferment before they can be cooked.

Ingredients

  • 3 cups teff flour, any variety (see cooking tip)
  • 1 teaspoon ground fenugreek
  • 5 tablespoons Ersho, at room temperature
  • 4 cups filtered water, plus more if needed
  • 1/2 teaspoon salt

Per injera: 96 calories, 3 g protein, 1 g fat (0 g sat), 19 g carbohydrates, 39 mg sodium, 43 mg calcium, 3g fiber

Directions

Day 1. Make the injera batter. Sift the flour and fenugreek into a large nonreactive bowl. Add the starter and water and whisk until smooth and well blended. Cover with a plate or clean, dry tea towel and let rest undisturbed in a warm, draft free place for 24 hours. In cooler months, put it in an unheated oven or on top of the fridge.



Day 2. If any liquid has accumulated on the surface, carefully pour it off (it’s okay if it’s dark). Gently stir the bubbly mixture, incorporating in any batter clinging to the sides of the bowl or plate. If you used a tea towel and it gets wet at any point, replace it with a dry one. Measure out 1/2 cup of the batter and transfer it to a small saucepan. Cook the batter over medium-high heat, stirring constantly, until the liquid evaporates and the batter turns into a thick, rubbery dough (once the pan gets hot, this will only take 2 to 3 minutes). Immediately remove from the heat and spread the dough out on a ceramic plate and let cool for 5 minutes. Return the cooked dough to the bowl of teff batter and blend using an immersion blender until smooth and bubbly. Alternatively, blend in batches using a food processor or blender and return the batter to the bowl. The batter should be the consistency of a thick slurry or crepe batter; if it seems too thick, whisk in a little filtered water to thin it out. Cover with a clean, dry tea towel and let rest undisturbed in a warm, draft-free place for 24 hours. In cooler months, put it in an unheated oven or on top of the fridge. A few hours after blending, you should notice that the batter has risen and is actively bubbling. This recipe is for folks like me who don’t own a mitad (a traditional injera griddle), as it produces injera that are smaller than those found in restaurants, making them more manageable to cook. If you’ve already made Ersho, homemade injera will take an additional thirty-six hours to ferment before they can be cooked. Teff sourdough crêpes Makes 16 (7-inch) injera

Day 3. If any dark liquid has accumulated on the surface, carefully pour it off (it’s okay if it’s dark). Add the salt and gently stir the bubbly ersho to combine; it should be the consistency of a thick slurry or thin crepe batter. If it’s too thick, add a small amount of filtered water as needed to thin.






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